Friday, October 24, 2014

MORE PHOTOS: TREE PLANTING WITH PURDUE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS


 POST FROM JACOB DADI
In May of this year, Purdue University students planted more than 75 trees at Ore Primary School near Tsavo West. Such events help inspire the young students in Primary schools to become responsible and take care of the environment.


Amara Conservation paid for ten thousand litres of water to be delivered to the school for watering the trees a few weeks afterward. The school patron of the wildlife club at Ore primary school selected two pupils to take care of each tree every day to make sure the tree grows well.


On 23rd September I visited the school to check on the trees and they are doing very well. Every pupil told me he/she was very keen about the trees, some could even tell the date and time when the tree started producing new leaves!


This was encouraging and I saw how the pupils were happy to have Amara Conservation be part of them in school. The dry season has taken over in Tsavo now - so it was impressive to see the trees growing so well.


The pupils had put a local fence around the area where the trees were planted and also surrounded each tree with sticks to prevent goats or cattle from eating them.


When I was there, the school patron of the wildlife club informed me that they had registered with wildlife clubs of Kenya and they were asking Amara Conservation to help them get a field trip to the park.


I discussed this with Lori and we were hoping to find someone to fund this. Meanwhile I asked Mr Mulati from Sheldrick Wildlife Trust if they could help out, and they said yes!


On October 8th, only two weeks since our discussion, more than 25 Ore primary school pupils are enjoying being in the Tsavo East National Park right now. They informed me on the phone that the kids are very happy today to see a live lion in its habitat, among many other wild animals. One could feel the joy of the students in the bus on the phone when I was talking to the head teacher.JACOB DADI

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Interpol To Help E. Africa Build Wildlife Crime Database



The International police organization, known as Interpol, pledged Monday to assist the East Africa region to build a regional intelligence database as part of effort to combat wildlife crime.

Interpol Assistant Director in charge of the Environmental Security Sub-Directorate David Higgins told a media briefing in Nairobi that the information will help dismantle criminal wildlife syndicates.

"We want the region to rely on intelligence analysis to eliminate illegal wildlife crime," Higgins said during the launch of the Interpol Environmental Security Office regional bureau.

The office, based in Nairobi, will serve 13 countries including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Sudan, South Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Seychelles and Djibouti. It will work on a number of environmental issues with a particular focus on addressing the illegal trafficking of ivory and rhinoceros horn.

The region's population of elephants and rhinos has been threatened with extinction as a result of illegal wildlife trade.

"We will ensure the region launches targeted responses against the criminal networks," the director said, adding that illegal wildlife crime is a transnational crime that requires greater collaboration among countries.

Interpol is planning to expand its presence in Eastern Africa so as to help national governments combat poaching and other forms of environmental crime. Interpol's Environmental Security Office will assist in enhancing cooperation between government, the private sector and NGOs, and thus boost the capacity of law enforcement agencies to act against the illicit wildlife trade

Kenya Wildlife Service Communication Manager Paul Udoto said that Kenya is seeking collaboration with regional and international partners to eliminate illegal wildlife crime.

Kenya has emerged as a major source and transit point for illegal wildlife crime. "We want to leverage on Interpol's experience on combating other crimes in order to save our wildlife species," Udoto said.

Kenya's tourism industry depends on its wildlife resources and beach destinations, and conservationists have blamed the continued poaching on the ready markets for the criminal networks that harvest the ivory.

The demand mainly emanates from Asia, which has pushed the price of a 1 kg of ivory from 100 U.S. dollars in the 1970s to over 1,500 dollars currently in the black market.

Kenya: Step Up War On Poaching, State Urged


Conservationists​ ​have called for serious measures to tackle porous borders responsible for trafficking of ivory, drugs and other criminal syndicates.

Speaking during the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos on Saturday, participants urged the government to step up security patrols and coordinate with neighbouring countries to tackle poaching.

The march took place in 136 cities and a host of towns across six continents. In Kenya, it started at the National Museums of Kenya and ended at the historic Uhuru Gardens.

Conservationist warned that rhinos and elephants may be wiped out in the next 10 years, if poaching is not addressed. "This march educated the public on the need to protect our ecosystem, which is the main foreign earner as well as source of jobs for our young people," Paula Kahumbu, Wildlifedirect executive officer said.

Kenya has lost about 116 elephants and 26 rhinos to poachers. Comparatively, the country lost 384 elephants and 30 rhinos in the year 2012 and about 289 elephants and 29 rhinos in 2011.

The march followed a recent report, Out of Africa: Mapping the Global Trade in Illicit Elephant Ivory, which detailed how ivory is smuggled into the market.

The report by Born Free USA, said the Mombasa Port registered the most illegal ivory seizures worldwide in 2013-2014, replacing Dar es Salaam Port.

"Mombasa has the highest number of seizures globally by volume, some 18 tonnes between 2009-2013, but despite a large number of containers seized in Asia and known to have originated from Tanzania, very few seizures are actually made at Tanzanian ports, likely due to mismanagement and corruption at port facilities," says the report.

It states that nearly all the ivory nabbed came from neighbouring countries. KWS director William Kiprono has been advocating for a sustained awareness campaigns on the plight of the rhinos.

Speaking during the World Rhino Day celebrations in Nyanyuki, Kiprono said deterrent and severe penalties will be applied for poachers and dealers of rhino products to robustly tackle the current high poaching threat to rhinos.

Article link found here:
http://allafrica.com/stories/201410060696.html

Monday, October 6, 2014

Amara Conservation Joins Global March for Elephants and Rhinos in Nairobi!


SHARE★LIKE★PIN

Elephants and Rhinos need us to help put an end to poaching. Help Amara gain sponsorships by liking us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest


To stay informed please read our home page Http://amaraconservation.org 

#ivoryforelephants #stoppoaching #elephants for #ivory #animals









Saturday, October 4, 2014

KENYA TO HOST INTERPOL SECURITY OFFICE

 

Kenya will host the Environmental Security Office of the international police organization, known as Interpol, said a statement from the Australian High Commission in Kenya received on Saturday.

It said the office, which will be based in Interpol's Regional Bureau for East Africa in Nairobi, is aimed at enhancing both national and international efforts towards the protection of wildlife.

The office will work on a number of environmental issues with a particular focus on addressing the illegal trafficking of ivory and rhinoceros horn.

"Interpol's Environmental Security Office will assist in enhancing cooperation between government, the private sector and NGOs, and thus boost the capacity of law enforcement agencies to act against the illicit wildlife trade," the statement said.

It said the office will be launched on Monday at a ceremony presided over by Kenya's Cabinet Secretary for Environment Judi Wakhungu in conjunction with the head of Interpol's Environmental Security Sub-Directorate, David Higgins, as well diplomats from Britain and Australia.


In June, Higgins said Interpol will deploy more personnel at its regional bureau in Kenya by the end of October.

"We want to stimulate the follow of intelligence, so that we can defeat the criminal networks, who are now using modern technology to escape detection," Higgins said during the UN Environmental Assembly held in Nairobi on June 27.

He said that China, Brazil, Netherlands, France are among the countries that will provide personnel to boost responses to environmental crime.

Rampant poaching of rhinos and elephants forced Nairobi to revise its laws to give stiffer penalties for poachers and other wildlife offenders.

Kenya's tourism industry depends on its wildlife resources and beach destinations, and conservationists have blamed the continued poaching on the ready markets for the criminal networks that harvest the merchandise.

Elephant is recognized as a flagship species representing the magnificent diverse wildlife resources in the continent.

Wildlife crime and related illegal trade is now globally ranked as one of the most serious international crimes.

Recent reports from wildlife conservationists indicated that proceeds of wildlife crime are also used to finance other international crimes including proliferation of illegal firearms, human trafficking and terrorism cartels of which no country or agency can single-handedly manage.

Interpol is planning to expand its presence in Eastern Africa so as help national governments combat poaching and other forms of environmental crime.

ANTI POACHING GROUP USES GRAFFITI FOR MESSAGE


Vandals Deface Iconic Mombasa Ivory Tusks With Anti-Poaching Message
The Star, Kenya
October 3, 2014

The elephant tusks that welcome visitors to Mombasa were painted red early Friday morning with a strong message denouncing ivory trade.

"Mombasa not 4 Ivory export," read the message.

The vandals, said to have defaced the property on Moi Avenue street at around 2.30am, are unknown.



The county government has issued a strict warning against those undermining the county's beautification project. Wildlife activists, however took to social media supporting the message and the action.

"This is a gud (sic) message for people who still conduct ivory trade, to get the tusk the elephant has to bleed. Bloody tusks, just like the bloody diamond," CM Jimmie posted on the Kenya For Wildlife Facebook page.


"While everyone is complaining about this, someone actually made an effort as an individual to stop poaching or to fight for the rights of animals. Fantastic idea and kudos to the team and the creative thought that may have sparked it. Time to put your money where your mouth is," Fatima Ali Mohamed wrote.


Article can be found here:
http://allafrica.com/stories/201410031328.html

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

JOIN THE GLOBAL MARCH OCTOBER 4!


We are gearing up for the Nairobi Global Elephant March this Saturday! It will be a big day and we hope the worldwide marches and attention will help us all to do our job and SAVE THEM!!

You Help Is Needed ...

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...